Thursday, 19 April 2007

Why your neighbour may vote BNP

[...] About 70 people are packed into a back room of the Golden Lion pub, with not a skinhead or pair of Doc Martens in sight and more tweeds than T-shirts. They are male and female, young and old, working class and middle class, ex-Labour and ex-Tory, several of them Daily Telegraph readers. They are mostly solid Yorkshire folk who have watched immigrants transform areas in which they grew up and believe — rightly or wrongly — that their way of life is under threat. They are bewildered more than hate-filled. They are fearful more than fear-inspiring, and feel gagged by political correctness. They do not come from sink estates. They are stakeholders, people with something to lose. “We’re being overwhelmed,” laments a retired Latin teacher. “I’ve nothing against other races. It’s just that they keep flooding into the country to breaking point,” says a lorry driver. “We can’t invite the whole world to live in England,” says a former merchant marine officer. Few will give their names.

Griffin and his fellow speakers do nothing to calm their fears. Quite the opposite. In a promotional video he decries the alleged banning of the cross of St George, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and even Piglet because the character offends Muslims. Against a background of soft music and beautiful scenery, a woman’s voice decries the millions of foreigners of all races settling in Britain: “The one thing they have in common is there are too many of them.”

Michelle Shrubb, a candidate who lived in South Africa, says that a black crimewave is coming to Britain. Nick Cass, the BNP’s Yorkshire organiser, declares that “decent British people are fed up to the back teeth with seeing the country fall apart and being called racist when they want to do something about it”. The merchandise table offers “It’s Cool to be White” T-shirts and “I vote BNP because they look after me” bumper stickers. BNP candidates are presented with rosettes for daring to stand up and be counted. Griffin humorously coaxes about £500 in donations from the audience, then answers questions for an hour. He puts on no airs and graces. He has a pint on the table beside him. He presents himself as an ordinary bloke, like his audience, who is fighting a corrupt elite that bleeds taxpayers for its disastrous social engineering projects and treats them with contempt. Read more

1 comment:

Daniel Roe said...

Q
Scary isn’t it
A
But not exactly rocketScience – I mean, all the ‘sensible’ politicians need to do is to stop being silly and re-engage with the ordinary voters – I mean our streets and homes were safe, if public transport was reliable, if schools and hospitals, whatever – I mean we’d all be happyBunnies – aye – and there’s what I call the peaceDividend
Q
Huh?
A
Imagine not having to shell out to clean up litter, vandalism and graffiti – imagine not have to shell out dole money to finance the drug habits of illiterate, unqualified, unemployable, sullen, frustrated, disaffected yoof. Imagine we had adequate prison accommodation and politicians and judges determined to make full use of them
Q
Hey, our insurance premiums would nosedive
A
We might even be able restore what was once one of the best pension systems in the world – but do you see where this is leading?
Q
Yes, but it doesn’t explain the racism – be it explicit or implicit
A
OK – how about this? Over the years, leftwing politicians have introduced education methods which have left millions illiterate, and they have destroyed the discipline in schools, so now some schools are unsafe.
Q
Surely, it’s not just the left
A
Right – fatcha’sBritain – hmm, instead of being upfront and honest, the Tories tried to introduce traditional methods and discipline by stealth
Q
Yeah, I remember – the teachers weren’t exactly the happiest of bunnies with all those extra tests and performance tables
A
They were somehow expected to guess that the remedy was traditional chalk and talk – and then it was the Tories who took us into the ERM (that’s the mediƦval version of the Euro)
Q
Well to be fair, all the parties were for it
A
Aye – this was ‘informed opinion’, the ‘sensible’ parties, the unions, the Yarts, etc, etc – and they didn’t care two hoots about the consequences: repossession of homes, unemployment, and loss of businesses – which brings us to the question of racism. The schools are turning out illiterate undisciplined kids unfit for anything, the factories are shut…
Q
You can imagine the frustration and resentment – and of course there’s the welfare or dependency culture
A
Now add to the mix a variety of religious and ethnic groups – all competing for welfare goodies such as housing
Q
And jobs
A
That’s assuming there are any jobs left – given the penchant for business rates, regulations, etc
Q
And of course, official ‘diversity’ policies have prevented the groups from integrating – yes I can see there’s potential for conflict and rivalry
A
And ‘diversity’ itself – far from affirming and respecting everyone equally, it has been a long and relentless campaign against indigenous people and their values – remember ‘Winterval’ – Christmas is seen as being offensive to other faiths and communities
Q
I don’t recall other faiths and communities objecting to Christmas and other indigenous customs
A
Exactly – it’s our home-grown ‘sensible’ politicians
Q
And some people are beginning to consider the ‘silly’ parties
A
Got it in one – these are the guys that give the impression that they are listening
Q
So if you are concerned that your kid is the only kid in the school who can speak English, these guys aren’t going to lock you up as a racist
A
There you go then – and at the risk of labouring the point, let me introduce two little boys – both are from the same background – it could be rich or poor – or any ethnic group or religion: numberOne is continually told that he will never be as good as his father or cousins and that he is never going to amount to much. When grade inflation means that there is a 99 percent success rate, this sad bunny is going to be the one percent
Q
I suppose numberTwo is the boy that gets encouragement and affirmation
A
Well yes – sure, whenever he fouls up, he’ll know about it, that’s the stick (I mean metaphorically) and it is immediately followed by the carrot – he is told that mummenDad know that he can do better – and with just a little bit of effort he can beat his father and cousins – OK, he might not be first class honours, but that won’t stop his going for it
Q
And getting a respectable twoOne
A
Well you can see where boy numberOne is going to end up – the point is this is exactly what is happening to the indigenous population. They and their culture and values are continually being rubbished – and they are accused of racism. Any effort they make at improvement is not good enough
Q
So why bother
A
Indeed – I mean take the Wilberforce events – people apologising – I dare say there will be more apologising in 50 years time – 2057 marks a quarter of a millennium since 1807 – I mean, what more is required? How can we bury this once and for all – draw a line – moveOn, if you will?
Q
True – but I guess people will argue that words are not enough – it’s like the ‘peace’ in the communion service
A
Where you are supposed to sort out any offences and wrongs before going to the altar
Q
Exactly – the other day the Vicar pointed out that repentance involves not only apology but doing something to put things right
A
So I guess repentance would be a good description of the years spent by the Royal Navy enforcing Wilberforce’s legislation – decades of sacrificial service – hmm – something we should celebrate – but don’t hold your breath
Q
I still find the BNP scary
A
True – but perhaps some of the policies from the ‘sensible’ parties are also scary – I mean shelling out money to spy on your dustbins
Q
Instead of collecting the rubbish – and there are ID cards, antismoking enforcement officers – when we can’t afford nurses and doctors
A
There you go then – the ‘sensible’ parties have made this country a wasteland by failing to deliver – schools, hospitals, safe streets, reliable public transport, adequate equipment for the forces – the list is endless
Q
And they have devoted time and money on messing around with the House of Lords, providing Scottish and Welsh assemblies
A
As if there weren’t enough sad losers in Parliament and our Town Hall
Q
And being scary and intrusive by interfering in our lives
A
And dustbins – and talking of rubbish, rubbishing indigenous values and culture – quite honestly the establishment message (hands over ears) is ‘La la – I’m not listening’
Q
So when someone comes along who is listening (or purports to be listening), people are going to take notice – if this report is true, then we can be afraid, very afraid – I mean (a) there is the traditional reluctance to vote for small parties – and (b) there is a growing reluctance to vote at all – when you read about these respectable guys down the pub.
A
Maybe it’s just pub talk – putting the world to rights – making the most of free speech – before the council starts snooping on pub conversations – well it’s sad and disaffected bunnies who are driven to move from talk to action – so the solution is happy bunnies – so all the ‘sensible’ politicians need to do is to stop being silly and re-engage with the ordinary voters – start listening – and doing – oh, and in our commendable attempt to affirm diversity, recognise indigenous people, culture and values as equal and valued partners and I’m sure the big tent is big enough to include the poor old Brits